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Kopi tiam

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Kopi tiam

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
A typical open-air kopitiam in Singapore
 
A stall selling ngo hiang

A kopitiam or kopi tiam is a traditional coffee shop found in Southeast Asia, patronised for meals and beverages. The word kopi is a Malay/Hokkien term for coffee and tiam is the Hokkien/Hakka term for shop (). Menus typically feature simple offerings: a variety of foods based on egg, toast, and kaya, plus coffee, tea, and Milo, a malted chocolate drink which is extremely popular in Southeast Asia, particularly Malaysia and Singapore and Brunei and in some parts of Indonesia, especially at Sumatra Island.

 

Singapore

Kopi tiams in Singapore are commonly found in almost all residential areas as well as some industrial and business districts in the country, numbering about 2,000 in total.[1] Although most are an aggregate of small stalls or shops, some may be more reminiscent of food courts, although each stall has similar appearance and the same style of signage.

In a typical kopi tiam, the drinks stall is usually run by the owner who sells coffee, tea, soft drinks, and other beverages as well as breakfast items like kaya toast, soft-boiled eggs and snacks. The other stalls are leased by the owner to independent stallholders who prepare a variety of food dishes, often featuring the cuisine of Singapore & cuisine of Malaysia. Traditional dishes from different ethnicities are usually available at kopitiams so that people from different ethnic backgrounds and having different dietary habits could dine in a common place and even at a common table.

Kopitiam is also the name of a food court chain in Singapore.

Some of the popular kopi tiams in Singapore include Kim San Leng, Killiney & Tong Ah Eating House or Ya Kun Kaya Toast

Some of the more common foods that can be seen in kopi tiams, besides the ever-popular eggs and toast, consist of char kway tiao (fried hor fun, sometimes cooked with eggs and cockles), Hokkien mee (mee noodles served with various seafoods as well as egg) and, possibly the most common, nasi lemak, or coconut rice (a Malay dish of coconut-flavoured rice, served with sambal chilli paste, egg, and ikan billis or anchovies).

 
Traditional Kopi O commonly served in Malaysia and Singapore

At kopi tiams (Chinese: 咖啡店; pinyin: kā fēi diàn; literally: "coffee shop"), coffee and tea are usually ordered using a specific vernacular featuring terms from different languages. "Kopi" (coffee) and "teh" (tea) can be tailored to suit the drinker's taste by using the following suffixes when ordering:

  • "Peng" (Chinese: ; pinyin: bīng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: peng; literally: "ice"): with ice
  • "C": with evaporated milk
  • "Siew dai": less sugar
  • "O": black, no milk
  • "O Kosong" ("Kosong"="Nothing"): black, no sugar
  • "kao": extra thick
  • "Poh": extra thin
  • "Milo": chocolate milk drink

(wikipedia)

               
                     
             
                     
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